JCPOA


Nuclear Deal Still Alive: Joint Commission meets to review Iran Nuclear Deal

On 25 April 2017, the Joint Commission (JC) established by the Iran Nuclear Deal, met in Vienna to review the implementation of the Nuclear Deal. Under the Nuclear Deal, the JC is responsible for overseeing the implementation of the JCPOA. The meeting, 5th meeting of the JC discussed amongst other things: cooperation in the field of civil nuclear safety, the modernization program of Arak, and sanctions relief.


President Trump Certifies Tehran’s Compliance with Nuclear Deal, but starts Review of Sanctions Relief

On 18 April 2017, U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson certified to Congress that Iran is in compliance with the recently concluded Nuclear Deal – Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA). However, he also announced that President Trump would start an inter-agency to review on the appropriateness of U.S. Iran sanctions relief.



OFAC Updates Iran Sanctions FAQ’s & Introduces General License J-1

On 15 December 2016, the U.S. Department of the Treasury‚Äôs Office of Foreign Assets Control updated its FAQ’s regarding the uplifting of sanctions under the JCPOA. The revision of the FAQ’s aim to clarify the U.S. intentions in regard to the triggering of JCPOA snap-back provisions. At the same time OFAC also introduced General License (GL) J-1 to allow the re-export of civilian aircraft to Iran (Authorizing the Re-exportation of Certain Civil Aircraft to Iran on Temporary Sojourn and Related Transactions).



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British PM Theresa May warns President-Elect Trump: Iran Nuclear Deal is Vital

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani met with British Prime Minister Theresa May for the first time_21-09-2016 _71st session of the United Nations General Assembly in New York_http://www.presstv.ir/Detail/2016/09/21/485646/rouhani-may-new-york On 07 December 2016, in a speech to the…




U.S. House of Representatives Renews Iran and Syria Sanctions

The U.S. House of Representatives extended Iran and Syrian sanctions. The blog argues that the new Syrian and the extended Iran sanctions are not Trumpism, but rather a signal of the Republican dominated U.S. Congress to Donald Trump that he has no carte blanche to deal with Iran, Syria, and possibly Russia which is indirectly impacted by the new Syrian sanctions. Although these sanctions might unhinge the current JCPOA or President Obama’s diplomatic efforts in Syria, in the long run we might be grateful to the U.S. Congress for reining in President-Elect Trump ability to act unilaterally.